DeSantis to Federalists: ‘My swamp is warmer than your swamp!’

With two looming Florida Supreme Court appointments on the horizon, Gov. Ron DeSantis pontificated about judicial overreach, congressional abdication of power, and “originalism” during a speech to The Federalist Society’s National Lawyers Convention last week.

DeSantis pointed out that, in what will be a little more than a year on the job, he will have appointed five justices to the Florida Supreme Court, comparing it to the record of predecessors Jeb Bush and Rick Scott, who together tapped just three justices in their combined 16 years in office.

“Sometimes these things just happen. I think it’s neat,” the Harvard Law School alum told the crowd at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D.C. on Thursday.

The governor’s speech begins around 15:45 in the video, or you can jump to the transcription below

President Donald Trump nominated Florida justices Robert Luck and Barbara Lagoa to the 11th U.S. District Court of Appeals, and the Senate is set to confirm Luck later today. Lagoa’s confirmation is expected to come shortly.

DeSantis, who served briefly in Congress before launching his gubernatorial bid last year, began his remarks, as all well-versed speakers do, with a few cracks.

“I am a recovering congressman so people ask me if I’m happy to be out of D.C.,” he said. “Of course I’m happy to be out of D.C. and my swamp is warmer right now than your swamp is. It’s about 75 degrees in Palm Beach.”

The governor, who noted that he had help from the Federalists when making his Supreme Court selections, focused his speech on originalism, a topic that left DeSantis at ease as he rattled off his concerns about the failures of all three branches to properly implement the founding fathers’ intentions.

Originalism and textualism — the concept of applying the Constitution based on the intent of the writers of the document at the time they wrote it — “is the right way to do it,” DeSantis said, referring to court appointments.

“The reason why I think that’s the right way to do it is because you have to have some objective measure to go by. You can’t just be flying off the seat of your pants, philosophizing and imposing whatever idiosyncratic views you have on society, under the guise of constitutional interpretation,” he said. “So originalism provides a mechanism to cabin judicial discretion, which I think is very, very important.”

In his 20-minute speech, the governor demonstrated his Yale and Harvard wonkiness while waxing about Hamilton, Madison and the Federalist papers.

DeSantis said one of his biggest frustrations in Washington was Congress’ reluctance to exercise its power.

“I think the founders were pretty clear about how the constitutional system was arranged and would operate.

You had three separate branches. One branch was not necessarily subordinate to the other, so when they say they were equal, in that sense, they were. But they certainly were not equal in terms of the powers that were assigned to the branches.

There was qualitative and quantitative differences between the branches. Clearly Madison said the legislative authority predominates in a republican system of government.

If you look at the powers assigned in Article 1 of the Constitution, I mean the power of the purse. The executive can do what they want. You take away the money, the executive can’t do it. So the Congress had robust powers and I think the founders viewed the Congress as the focal point in constitutional government.

They thought the executive would have an important role, but that would really depend on the exigencies. Obviously, if you’re engaging in any type of military conflict, the president’s commander-in-chief, in foreign affairs the president had a very important role.

But, ultimately, even though the president could veto acts, the legislature could check that veto by overriding the veto.

So the president was important, but they also had just rebelled against the king and so they did not envision the exuecitve sas it is today with the massive bureaucracy.

And then of course they thought the courts were important but, as Hamilton said, by far the weakest of the three branches, because it could exercise neither force nor will but merely judgment.

It ultimately depends on the executive to enforce its judgments.

So that was kind of their view.

The court will play a role, but it will not be the dominant role in the constitutional system.

Well, I think today, having served in the Congress, to me, Congress is by far the weakest of the three branches.

Its most robust power — the power of the purse — it effectively has just put on autopilot. A lot of the spending is just automatic anyways, and then the rest they use continuing resolutions to just basically perpetuate government and perpetuate the status quo.

Very rarely are they actually using the power of the purse to discipline the executive branch, to rein in any type of executive overreach. And that is true, regardless of who’s in, which party or the other has been in.

So you have a really neutered legislative branch.”

Here’s the rest of his speech:

“Really, I did more in one week as governor than I did in six years in Congress. And I was active. I worked hard. It’s just, they don’t use the authority they have in an effective way and I think the constitutional system is discombobulated as a result.

Of course, the executive branch, when you look at what the president is able to do, some of that is just circumstances. We’re more involved internationally …

Most of the people that come to see me in Congress that had a problem with something with the federal government did not have a problem with anything we were actually passing in Congress. It was the agencies that were doing this and doing that. So most of the lawmaking was being done by the executive branch agencies.

So you had a massive bureaucracy grow and you had the the executive function really exercising both legislative and in some cases judicial powers, which is not something the founders would want to do..

Then you have the court which, in some respects, in some instances, I think, sees itself as being almost superior to the other branches and superior to the Constitution itself, even, and has gotten involved in a whole host of diff things that I think they probably had no jurisdiction to deal with.

But certainly the court has more of an impact than the Congress, day in and day out, even accepting only 80 cases a year.

So that’s kind of the system. It causes me to reflect.

I think it’s great you have two supreme court justices here, all these circuit judges, but the fact that that is viewed as a major achievement to me suggests that the courts are exercising too much power in the first place.

Joseph Story, I think he was confirmed within five days. Stephen field, cduring the civil war, Lincoln nominates him, within a week he’s confirmed. …

The fact that we have all these titantic struggles about who sits on that shows that the court is playing too big a role in our society.

There’s some that say, if we get enough originalists on the Supreme Court and the lower courts, then everything can be made right, and everything will be good.

I think that would be beneficial, don’t get me wrong.

But I have to think back to Federalist 51. The whole premise of the system is you’re not going to have the right people in the positions of power. That’s why they designed the system the way they did. Because they said that if angels were to govern men, then no government would be necessary.

That is something that the founders believed at their core — that you had to have a system of checks and balances to keep each branch in line.

So for me, I want to see great judges. I think that’s important. But I also want to see a system that works, even when you have the wrong people in power.

I think judicial power is too robust right now and I think the checks upon it are just simply inadequate.

Part of it is you can go back to the original design and see the checks on it, but also the checks that are there really aren’t used by the Congress any more.

One of the areas … that brings this into focus is the use of these nationwide injunctions by one district judge.

You have a national policy that’s put in place by the executive branch and then you have a flurry of lawsuits. So the executive wins in Boston. They win in New York. They win in Atlanta. They win in Minneapolis. They win in Las Vegas. But they lose in San Francisco. And so, guess what?

You win all those other ones, you lose in San Francisco, so the whole policy is put on ice? We could sit there and say, oh yeah, these are just rogue district judges. They’re part of the legal resistance. They’re resisting Trump and all this stuff and the Supreme Court will correct it. They have corrected a lot of these. And that is true. But what happens in the meantime?

You’ve got like two years that goes by where the policy is frozen, just because you have one district judge that puts it on hold? To me, one district judge issuing a nationwide injunction is not a legitimate use of judicial power. I’d like to see the U.S. Supreme Court rein that in.

But I think there’s probably things Congress can do to rein that in.

But that’s just the thing. The checks that are there – jurisdiction-stripping – hasn’t proven to be that effective.

Hamilton said, if a judge gets off the rails, he’ll get impeached and removed from office. That hasn’t proven to be successful.

In the Federalist, Hamilton suggests that if the judges get off the rails then the executive will just let that decision go but not really enforce it…

But I think that we’re in a situation now where whatever institutional counteraction that the founders envisioned, that’s just simply overwhelmed by the partisan interests that you see now in national politics.

There may be something that’s detrimental for your branch, but if that’s more for your team in the partisanship is going in a good direction, then you’re willing to see your own branch diminished in order to achieve the more partisan ends.

And that goes with both sides. But I think the founders believed that where you sit was where you were supposed to stand, when it comes to institutional power.

But that’s not really where it is. You do not see a robust defense across party lines of Congress’s prerogatives, of the executive’s prerogatives, when those prerogatives are challenged. It’s all situational. So the Congress really cares about its law-making authority when President Obama is doing some of these more legislative in nature executive orders but the same people that didn’t care about that, they now care about it when the president’s different, and vice versa.

So that to me is something that’s not going to be an effective check.

I think back. Lincoln, he had to confront the Dred Scott decision, which was obviously one of the worst cases the Supreme Court has ever decided.

And in his inaugural address, he said that if you have the whole policy of the whole country decided by the Supreme Court based on one lawsuit between two parties, then the people are no longer their own rulers. They’re essentially turning over thieir authority to this eminent tribunal.

Dred Scott said you cannot prohibit slavery in the territories. Well, the whole republican party was founded to prohibit slavery in the territories. So that’s kind of like saying that the Republican party itself was unconstitutional at the time.

So Lincoln, they went ahead and they did ban it, in 1862, in spite of Dred Scott.

But Lincoln had to wrestle with this before he was president.

So he said, OK, if a decision’s made, if we just don’t honor any decision, then you just have lawlessness. So he always honored it with respect to the parties and the case in Dred Scott.

But he said I’m just not ready to say that this settles the policy for the whole country infinitum.

And he went through different factors in his judgment. He believed that a unanimous decision carried more weight than a split decision. I think Dred Scott was 7-2. He said that if a decision broke down on party lines, then he’d be less likely to say that that settled policy for the whole country. And then he said if it was a novel interpretation that was at odds with how previous branches had viewed it — for example, Congress had enacted a lot of legislation that presumed they had the authority to regulate slavery in the territories — that that would be something he would consider.

But this was something that he really, really struggled with.

I don’t suggest that there’s easy answers to it. But what I would like to suggest is that in our system of government, it’s the constitution that is supreme. It’s not the judiciary that is supreme. Courts are part of the constitutional system but they do not hover above the constitutional system. And the more serious that other political actors take their role, I think the stronger our constitutional system will be.

So the point I’ll make is, originalism, I think is important to figure out how you do constitutional interpretation, how you apply legislative text, but also I consider originalism to be the structural constitution and how different people who are actually in these branches are going to use their authority to preserve their own institutional interests.

If we say originalism is only about interpreting a statute or only about interpreting the bill of rights, then I think we’re leaving so much on the table. And ultimately, even though an originalist judge I think would be more respectful of the separation of powers than a non-originalist judge, we’re kind of tacitly still saying that the judiciary is superior to the other branches of government. I don’t think that’s what the founding fathers envisioned. And I don’t think that’s what’s the best for the country.

So members of Congress, if I was still there, I would tell them to take their obligations to protect their institution seriously, and the same thing with the executive branch.

True originalism means all these branches checking and balancing each other just as the founding fathers intended.

 

 

Rick Scott: ‘The weather’s not bad, either’

Florida U.S. Sen. Rick Scott put on his Sunshine State cheerleader outfit to promote President Donald Trump’s “relocation” to Florida.

Scott, who served for two terms as Florida governor prior to his election to the U.S. Senate a year ago, chastised Orlando Sentinel guest columnist Bob Morris, who poked fun at Trump for his move.

Scott said he found it “interesting” that a Florida paper would publish a guest columnist who mocked “his own state just to make a political point.”

(We thought that’s what op-ed writers do, but nevermind.)

“The partisanship has driven everyone crazy. But I refuse to let our extreme, negative and partisan culture interfere with the truth,” Scott wrote in a letter to the editor.

More from Scott’s missive to the editor:

The truth is, Florida is the best state in the nation — to live, to work, and to raise a family. It’s ridiculous that someone would try to diminish the fact that our state has low taxes, as if that wouldn’t be motivation for a family to move here. Anyone who would argue otherwise has clearly never had to struggle to support a family.

I’m glad the president is choosing to make Florida home, just like I’m glad every time a family or business chooses Florida. So let’s stop making everything about politics and just take a minute to appreciate what a great state Florida truly is.

The weather’s not bad either.

Make America Shop Again! (Christmas edition)

Red-hot Republicans searching for something special to put under the Christmas tree next month?

President Donald’s got ya.

trump xmas

“The official Donald J. Trump store offers unique, one-of-a-kind gifts. Show someone you care, all while supporting our Make America Great Again movement!” the website coaxes.

Items available include the cutesy KAG (Keep America Great) Santa hat, pictured below, selling for a mere $30:

Screen Shot 2019-11-07 at 11.36.18 AM

Or for those who want something to hang on the tree instead of their heads and have a little more dosh to spend, there’s this $60 ornament:

Screen Shot 2019-11-07 at 11.38.40 AM

There’s also a wood Trump/Pence 2020 semi-truck ($35) or a Trump/Pence wooden mini train set ($40).

But for those who have their own gifts in mind, never fear. You can wrap them up in paper bearing the campaign logo:

Screen Shot 2019-11-07 at 11.41.03 AM

We’ll happily give equal time to the Dems, if you let us know of holiday merch being hawked on the blue side of the political line.

— By Dara Kam, with special thanks to Jim Turner for this post.

Pam Bondi: Jared Kushner ‘one of the smartest human beings I’ve ever met’

Appearing on Fox & Friends this morning, former Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi expounded on her new role advocating for President Donald Trump as impeachment proceedings against him heat up, saying she’ll not only be handling not only the media, but “legal issues and just lots of stuff.”

https://video.foxnews.com/v/6101434412001/

“We’re all of course big fans of the president,” Bondi said, when asked about her and former Treasury spokesman Tony Sayegh being tapped by the White House as impeachment-related aides. Impeachment hearings begin next week.

Bondi, joined the D.C. office of Tallahassee-based lobbying powerhouse Ballard Partners after she left office in January, was an early Trump adopter, backing him during the 2016 primary and cheerleading for him during the presidential campaign.

Since going to D.C., sources tell us, Bondi, a lawyer, is a frequent visitor to the White House, and has a close relationship with the president.

The Wall Street Journal’s Michael C. Bender, a former Florida Capitol Press Corps reporter, wrote yesterday that Bondi and Sayegh were enlisted to help with Trump’s efforts to battle the impeachment efforts.

The duo “would potentially be coming in to help out with, not only comms, but with special projects and legal issues and just lots of stuff with the White House,” Bondi told Fox & Friends this morning. “They’re so crazy busy and they’re all doing such great work.”

The Fox gang was in St. Pete, following last night’s award of the conservative news channel’s “Patriot Awards.”

Bondi said she’d be part of a “huge team” helping make Trump’s case, not that they’re necessary.

“The president, frankly, is his best spokesperson,” she said.

—By Dara Kam and Jim Turner.

 

It’s official: Bondi tapped as top Trump impeachment aide

Pam-Bondi-BW-1000px-v5-75p-1Former Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi, who was long-rumored to be joining the White House or FOX News before she left office in January, is going to help President Donald Trump fight House impeachment efforts, the Wall Street Journal reported Wednesday.

Instead of going back to her old haunt, FOX, or signing up as one of the president’s official cheerleaders, Bondi went to work for Ballard Partners after leaving office in January.

Lately, it’s been rumored that Bondi — who worked for the state attorney in Tampa and was a FOX News regular before her election as AG — would lead Trump’s impeachment efforts.

That was confirmed by Wall Street Journal reporter Michael C. Bender, a former Tampa Bay Times reporter in Tallahassee, in a tweet today.

Bender, who also worked for The Palm Beach Post, tweeted that Bondi and former Treasury spokesman Tony Sayegh were being added as White House impeachment related aides.

“Adding Sayegh & Bondi is both an acknowledgment Trump needs help coordinating a response to the House probe, & a compromise between competing factions in the White House where rivalries opened during a two week-long process deliberation over which adviser to bring inside,” Bender tweeted.

Bondi “had the backing of Stephanie Grisham and Mick Mulvaney and is also close to POTUS, but her work as a lobbyist presented snarls to tangle for her and the White House,” Bender tweeted.

Truth or Dara has been told by insiders that Bondi — and Panhandle Congressman Matt Gaetz — are regular visitors to the White House.

The move comes with House Democrats set to hold public hearings next week with key witnesses in the impeachment proceedings.

— By Jim Turner.

It’s pythons vs. hogs, as Gators face off against Dawgs

Pigs and pythons are on the line as the Gators vs. Bulldogs clash Saturday afternoon in Jacksonville.

After much teasing throughout the week that a gubernatorial bet was in the works for the gridiron clash between the 6th ranked University of Florida and 8th ranked University of Georgia, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis and Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp tweeted out videos of what they were putting on the line.

A UF victory means the governors would head to the Everglades to help hunt Burmese pythons.

“We need the help. We’re making progress. But I’d love to see the Gators win and Gov. Kemp come down there. And who knows, you may end up with a pair of python boots on the end of it,” DeSantis said in his video.

A Georgia win, meanwhile, sends DeSantis into Southern Georgia, where feral pigs are infesting area farms.

“I know that wild hog sausage is a lot better than python,” Kemp said.

Kickoff is at 3:30 p.m.

By NSF’s relentless Jim Turner.

Florida journos embracing ‘fake news?’

focused-business-people-reading-news-smartphone_1262-14213Florida’s branch of the Society of Professional Journalists said it’s starting to send cease-and-desist letters to President Donald Trump over the use of the term “fake news.”

The society’s Florida Pro Chapter, which intends to issue the letters to Trump and other “frequent abusers” of the term, is basing its action on their pending trademark application for the term to the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

Of course, it’s not an application they believe will be approved.

“For what it’s worth, we don’t expect the trademark to get approved. No one can really trademark a generic term like ‘fake news,’ which started being used long before Trump even took office,” wrote Emily Bloch, the chapter president, in Teen Vogue. “What we do hope is that this idea is outrageous enough to get people to stop and think about what fake news is, and what it means to them.”

Bloch, also an education reporter for the Florida Times-Union in Jacksonville, wrote the action is based upon a study by the Knight Foundation and Gallup that found 40 percent of Republicans say accurate news stories that cast a politician or political group in a negative light should “always” be considered fake news.

“So yes, this is satire. It’s a joke. But it’s a joke with a point, and as any student of public discourse will tell you, a joke sometimes hits harder than the truth,” she wrote, truthfully.

Here’s the top of Bloch’s piece:

Being a journalist right now is scary. It’s frightening when sketchy videos about shooting news agencies are presented at a political conference held at a resort owned by the president. It’s terrifying when, a year after bombs were sent to CNN, a shirt suggesting reporters should be hanged is casually worn on an airplane.

But it’s also infuriating, like when our country’s own president is constantly devaluing our work and has made a habit out of brushing off dogged reporting as “fake news.”
By Jim Turner.

DeSantis: Israel has “total right” to run again, “no similarities” between sheriff suspension and Trump impeachment

IMG_2094A day after a key Senate committee handed Gov. Ron DeSantis a major victory in his crusade against embattled Broward Sheriff Scott Israel, the governor pooh-poohed any parallels between his suspension of Israel and Congressional Democrats’ efforts to unseat President Donald Trump.

DeSantis, Trump ally whose endorsement by the Republican president help boost him to a primary election victory and ultimately into the governor’s mansion last year, also told reporters today that Israel, a Democrat who is running for re-election, has the right to seek office again.

During yesterday’s Senate Rules Committee, one of Israel’s supporters, who identified himself as a “lifelong Republican” who voted for the GOP governor, equated suspension of Israel — an elected official — to the ongoing impeachment effort.

Rules Chairwoman Lizbeth Benacquisto quickly shut down that argument, but a reporter asked DeSantis about any similarities after Tuesday morning’s Cabinet meeting.

“I see no similarities between a presidential impeachment and the removal of a county official. This is a provision of the Florida Constitution. It talks about neglect of duty or incompetence. Obviously, we’ve seen multiple failures out of that agency. In fact, that agency, under his leadership, lost the state certification, and now it’s being reinstated under the new sheriff,” DeSantis said. “Look, had we not acted, my fear was that more failures would have put more people at risk. So I think I acted appropriately and I think that the Senate ultimately will come to that conclusion.”

The Rules Committee overturned the recommendation of Senate Special Master Dudley Goodlette, who found the governor failed to present evidence supporting his decision to suspend Israel, one of DeSantis’ first actions after taking office in January. Goodlette, former Republican state representative who is highly regarded in legislative circles, recommended that the Senate reinstate the embattled sheriff.

But voting 9-7 along party lines after a marathon meeting yesterday, the Rules Committee supported the governor’s suspension. The full Senate will vote on the matter tomorrow at 2 p.m.

Speaking to reporters Tuesday morning, DeSantis thanked the committee, which heard emotional, heart-wrenching pleas from the families of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School mass shooting victims. The families are united in their insistence that Israel be prevented from getting his old job back. Dozens of Israel supporters also attended the meeting, including numerous members of black churches who expressed their allegiance to the sheriff.

“It was a very long day, with that process,” DeSantis said Tuesday. “I also want to thank the Parkland families for coming. It wasn’t easy for them. This has been a long time coming. I think they really showed a lot of strength, and I look forward to the Senate disposing of this matter tomorrow, and look forward to moving on.”

The expectation is for another, party-line vote in the Republican-dominated upper chamber that will result in Israel being permanently ousted from his job.

Israel, who was re-elected in 2016 by more than 70 percent of Broward County voters, remains popular in most parts of the heavily Democratic county. He told reporters after the Senate committee vote last night that he believes he will be re-elected to the seat he held until he was booted by DeSantis in January.

DeSantis was asked if he would remove Israel again, should the sheriff win re-election.

“No, no, no, no. Look, the people can make that decision going forward. But then, what happens will be, they’ll be responsible for whatever decision is made in that respect. It’s not going to be something that is going to matter to me either way. I had to make the decision I had to make. Those folks can make whatever decision that they want to make,” the governor said.

When pressed about removing Israel a second time, DeSantis — a Harvard Law School grad — reiterated his stance.

“Well, obviously if there was another basis, but no. This is this. If the Senate does concur he be removed, there’s nothing in the Constitution that bars someone from then seeking the same office again. Totally has a right to do it,” he said.

 

Luck, Lagoa on track to leave Florida Supremes

Florida Supreme Court Justices Barbara Lagoa and Robert Luck, en route to the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit, received a friendly vetting Wednesday by a Senate committee.

President Donald Trump tapped the two Florida justices for the Atlanta appeals court just months after Gov. Ron DeSantis named them to serve on the Sunshine State’s highest court.

“Justices Barbara Lagoa and Robert J. Luck faced little pushback from members of the Senate Judiciary Committee during their nomination hearing Wednesday morning, as they fielded questions about “judicial activism” and how they would approach precedent as members of the federal judiciary,” The National Law Journal reported Wednesday.

If Lagoa and Luck get the go-ahead to join the appellate court, as is widely anticipated, DeSantis will have the opportunity to appoint two new state court justices to take their place.

That would put the governor in the rare position of appointing five Florida Supreme Court justices in his first term as the state’s chief executive.

The Judicial Nominating Commission is responsible for delivering a list of names to the governor to fill the vacancies.

But that process won’t kick in until Luck and Lagoa officially leave the bench after being confirmed by the Senate, a process which could drag on until December.

Once the vacancies occur, the JNC has 60 days to give a list of possible replacements to the governor and DeSantis will have an additional 60 days to make his choices.

 

Ben Crump slams Harvard prez over 13th Amendment comments: Beyond tone-deaf and insulting

Website_Attorney-Pohto_Ben-Crump-1-2Harvard president Larry Bacow is under fire for comments he made last week, in which he used the 13th Amendment, which freed slaves, to illustrate a new policy that allows alums at the Ivy League school to donate to any of its colleges.

Bacow apologized for his remarks, saying he understands they may have “unsettled” some who heard them.

“I regret that these comments caused offense,” Bacow said in an internal e-mail, the Boston Globe reported. “That certainly was not my intent.”

From the Globe report:

Bacow had suggested Tuesday that just as the 13th Amendment banned the ownership of African-Americans, Harvard’s individual schools could no longer “own” their specific wealthy graduates, according to those who attended the meeting at the Sanders Theater on campus.

But Bacow’s apology fell far short, at least as far as civil rights lawyer Ben Crump is concerned.

Crump, who’s got ties to Tallahassee, dressed down the Harvard official in a letter:

I must tell you how deeply disturbed I was to hear your recent comments that compared the university’s new policy granting well-heeled alums the “freedom” to donate money to the program of their choice to the Thirteenth Amendment granting freedom to African slaves.

While I agree with those who have called the comments tone deaf and insulting, I believe they go well beyond that. They reveal an utter lack of understanding — and caring — of the horrific toll of slavery and the continuing pain endured by people of color in America, more than 400 years after the start of slavery.

Crump this week was at the side of Brandt Jean at the trial of Amber Guyger, the former Dallas police officer who was convicted of killing Ms. Jean’s 26-year-old son, Botham. Guyger was sentenced to 10 years behind bars for the shooting death of her neighbor.

In Florida, Crump represented the family of Trayvon Martin, the gray hoody-clad, unarmed black teenager who was shot dead by neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman in Sanford seven years ago.

Crump — an FSU grad — has gone on to national acclaim as a civil rights attorney, hosting his own television show and opening offices in numerous states.

Here’s the full text of Crump’s missive to the Harvard president:

“Dear President Bacow:

 I write to you as many things:

As a descendent of African slaves, who recently traveled to Ghana to stand at the “Door of No Return” and imagine my ancestors’ terror in being torn from their homes, transported across the ocean in agonizing conditions, and sold into a brutal life of slavery.  

As the son of a loving black woman who, as a single parent, spent her days working two jobs and scrubbing white people’s floors just to earn enough to keep food on the table for my siblings and me.

 As the first member of my family to graduate from college with an advanced degree.

As a lawyer who has represented the families of dozens of black men who were brutalized by police or slain for the “crime” of being black and presumed dangerous.

In light of all those roles, I must tell you how deeply disturbed I was to hear your recent comments that compared the university’s new policy granting well-heeled alums the “freedom” to donate money to the program of their choice to the Thirteenth Amendment granting freedom to African slaves. 

While I agree with those who have called the comments tone deaf and insulting, I believe they go well beyond that. They reveal an utter lack of understanding — and caring — of the horrific toll of slavery and the continuing pain endured by people of color in America, more than 400 years after the start of slavery.

When you acknowledged how your statement might have “unsettled” some people and then offered the thinnest of apologies (“I regret that these comments caused offense. That certainly was not my intent.”) it further underscored that you just don’t get the African American experience in America. 

Our country requires – and indeed a majority of its population has demanded – a national reckoning on American slavery, its complete history and those effects that 300-years in bondage visited upon African-Americans before and since the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment.

As your own website acknowledges, “Harvard was directly complicit in America’s system of racial bondage from the College’s earliest days in the 17th century…and continued to be indirectly involved through extensive financial and other ties to the slave south up to the time of emancipation.”

Harvard is among the most privileged places on earth. But privilege creates blind spots. Your comments on the 13th amendment demonstrate an inordinately large blind spot about the African American experience and the long shadow cast by institutions like Harvard that benefited greatly from slavery.

To quote the recent editorial written by The Harvard Crimson editorial staff: “If Bacow sincerely wishes to meaningfully understand why people found his comments distasteful and to learn from the experience we implore him to do more than just issue a lackluster email apologizing for his audience’s emotions.”

I urge you to take the advice of your students and make a meaningful change.”